Discussion:
bought non-wireless priinter by mistake
(too old to reply)
micky
2014-12-07 20:59:14 UTC
Permalink
My friend didn't think about wireless or laptops and bought a printer
without wireless. It connects ONLY by USB. It's too late to return
it.

a) I know you can disconnect a USB harddrive by just pulling the cord
out, or you risk losing data**, but what's the most damage you could do
just by unplugging a printer? Interrupt the job and have to print it
again? And not even that if your last print job has already printed?
Or if it had stopped with an error message? Maybe he can just
transfer the cable from the desktop to the laptop when he wants to
print.

b) Or he can leave the printer connected to his desktop computer and if
there were some sort of Y USB connector, maybe he could just plug the
laptop in to the other fork of the Y. The Y's are called hubs, but I
think of them as outgoing to more than one add-on device. Especially
powered hubs. Would it work to plug the common port of a hub into the
printer, one of the multiple ports into the desktop, and when needed
plug the laptop in one of the other mulitple ports. (I don't know what
words to use for common and mulitple. I mean input and output, but in
this case the data would be going the opposite direction.)

I'm interested in all this myself, so any answers for a PC are greatly
appreciated.

OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?

Or maybe he can make it wireless.
c) I think the cheapest wireless print server I found online was 20
dollars if no one else bids. Used of course. Would anyone buy that, or
would you just buy a new wireless printer? If you're curious, here's
its ad.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/LevelOne-WPS-9122-Wireless-G-Print-Server-w-One-USB-2-0-Port-/141491097877?pt=US_Print_Servers&hash=item20f186d115
auction ends at 10:30 tonight Sunday EST

d) Hmmm. I have a USB equivalent of an internal wifi card, to receive
signals from the router. If it can receive internet signals from the
router, can it plug into a USB printer and make a printer accept,
printer text signals from the same router, coming from the local network
computer instead of the the DSL modem?
(I suppose not, or I'd have heard about it, but I don't know why it
wouldn't.)



**What if you absolutely know you haven't written to a USB hard drive
for the last 10 minutes. Is there a chance of losing data or damaging
the structure by just pulling out the USB cord, or by turning off t he
power to the external drive??

Thanks.
Paul
2014-12-07 23:26:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
My friend didn't think about wireless or laptops and bought a printer
without wireless. It connects ONLY by USB. It's too late to return
it.
Since that printer was a bargain, now the friend
can buy two printers :-) One for each computer.

There is no reason for the printer to freak out,
if you move the USB connector. Make sure the
printer has returned to the home position,
before pulling a fast one on it.

They make USB sharing boxes, but those don't
give me a warm feeling, in terms of how long
they last. I have no experience with such things,
and I'd rather just move the USB connector. Metal
USB connectors are rated at 5000 insertion cycles.

Paul
Good Guy
2014-12-07 23:42:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
My friend didn't think about wireless or laptops and bought a printer
without wireless. It connects ONLY by USB. It's too late to return
it.
a) I know you can disconnect a USB harddrive by just pulling the cord
out, or you risk losing data**, but what's the most damage you could do
just by unplugging a printer? Interrupt the job and have to print it
again? And not even that if your last print job has already printed?
Or if it had stopped with an error message? Maybe he can just
transfer the cable from the desktop to the laptop when he wants to
print.
b) Or he can leave the printer connected to his desktop computer and if
there were some sort of Y USB connector, maybe he could just plug the
laptop in to the other fork of the Y. The Y's are called hubs, but I
think of them as outgoing to more than one add-on device. Especially
powered hubs. Would it work to plug the common port of a hub into the
printer, one of the multiple ports into the desktop, and when needed
plug the laptop in one of the other mulitple ports. (I don't know what
words to use for common and mulitple. I mean input and output, but in
this case the data would be going the opposite direction.)
I'm interested in all this myself, so any answers for a PC are greatly
appreciated.
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Or maybe he can make it wireless.
c) I think the cheapest wireless print server I found online was 20
dollars if no one else bids. Used of course. Would anyone buy that, or
would you just buy a new wireless printer? If you're curious, here's
its ad.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/LevelOne-WPS-9122-Wireless-G-Print-Server-w-One-USB-2-0-Port-/141491097877?pt=US_Print_Servers&hash=item20f186d115
auction ends at 10:30 tonight Sunday EST
d) Hmmm. I have a USB equivalent of an internal wifi card, to receive
signals from the router. If it can receive internet signals from the
router, can it plug into a USB printer and make a printer accept,
printer text signals from the same router, coming from the local network
computer instead of the the DSL modem?
(I suppose not, or I'd have heard about it, but I don't know why it
wouldn't.)
**What if you absolutely know you haven't written to a USB hard drive
for the last 10 minutes. Is there a chance of losing data or damaging
the structure by just pulling out the USB cord, or by turning off t he
power to the external drive??
Thanks.
All printers I have seen so far are wireless so god knows what it means
in your post. However, some computers can be networked and accessed
wirelessly so you need to tell us what exactly are you trying to do.

To network a printer, it needs to have a network card and some machines
come with the card like the HP ones I buy and on some you can insert a
network card. On some it is almost impossible to insert the card and so
they can be connected using what was called in the XP days as P2P. I
don't use XP anymore so I won't talk about this anymore.

Basically, the printer in connected to one computer and then all other
machines can connect to this computer to print something - this could be
wirelessly if you want it or using the cable.

Hope you get the idea.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2014-12-08 23:14:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
My friend didn't think about wireless or laptops and bought a
printer
without wireless. It connects ONLY by USB. It's too late to return
it.
(How much was the printer?)
[]
Post by micky
c) I think the cheapest wireless print server I found online was 20
dollars if no one else bids. Used of course. Would anyone buy that, or
would you just buy a new wireless printer? If you're curious,
[]
Post by micky
All printers I have seen so far are wireless so god knows what it means
in your post.  However, some computers can be networked and accessed
Well, you haven't looked too hard; there are still wireless-less (!)
printers about, though not too many in the range normally offered to
home users.
Post by micky
wirelessly so you need to tell us what exactly are you trying to do.
[]
Yes, it depends why micky's friend wants to make the printer wireless:
is it just to avoid being tied to it, or does he want to use it from
multiple machines?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Old soldiers never die - only young ones
Bennett
2014-12-08 01:04:43 UTC
Permalink
Look into a wireless print server, e.g., this
article is helpful

http://www.labnol.org/gadgets/make-wired-printer-wireless/12639/
Post by micky
My friend didn't think about wireless or laptops and bought a printer
without wireless. It connects ONLY by USB. It's too late to return
it.
a) I know you can disconnect a USB harddrive by just pulling the cord
out, or you risk losing data**, but what's the most damage you could do
just by unplugging a printer? Interrupt the job and have to print it
again? And not even that if your last print job has already printed?
Or if it had stopped with an error message? Maybe he can just
transfer the cable from the desktop to the laptop when he wants to
print.
b) Or he can leave the printer connected to his desktop computer and if
there were some sort of Y USB connector, maybe he could just plug the
laptop in to the other fork of the Y. The Y's are called hubs, but I
think of them as outgoing to more than one add-on device. Especially
powered hubs. Would it work to plug the common port of a hub into the
printer, one of the multiple ports into the desktop, and when needed
plug the laptop in one of the other mulitple ports. (I don't know what
words to use for common and mulitple. I mean input and output, but in
this case the data would be going the opposite direction.)
I'm interested in all this myself, so any answers for a PC are greatly
appreciated.
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Or maybe he can make it wireless.
c) I think the cheapest wireless print server I found online was 20
dollars if no one else bids. Used of course. Would anyone buy that, or
would you just buy a new wireless printer? If you're curious, here's
its ad.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/LevelOne-WPS-9122-Wireless-G-Print-Server-w-One-USB-2-0-Port-/141491097877?pt=US_Print_Servers&hash=item20f186d115
auction ends at 10:30 tonight Sunday EST
d) Hmmm. I have a USB equivalent of an internal wifi card, to receive
signals from the router. If it can receive internet signals from the
router, can it plug into a USB printer and make a printer accept,
printer text signals from the same router, coming from the local network
computer instead of the the DSL modem?
(I suppose not, or I'd have heard about it, but I don't know why it
wouldn't.)
**What if you absolutely know you haven't written to a USB hard drive
for the last 10 minutes. Is there a chance of losing data or damaging
the structure by just pulling out the USB cord, or by turning off t he
power to the external drive??
Thanks.
Keith Nuttle
2014-12-08 01:31:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
My friend didn't think about wireless or laptops and bought a printer
without wireless. It connects ONLY by USB. It's too late to return
it.
a) I know you can disconnect a USB harddrive by just pulling the cord
out, or you risk losing data**, but what's the most damage you could do
just by unplugging a printer? Interrupt the job and have to print it
again? And not even that if your last print job has already printed?
Or if it had stopped with an error message? Maybe he can just
transfer the cable from the desktop to the laptop when he wants to
print.
b) Or he can leave the printer connected to his desktop computer and if
there were some sort of Y USB connector, maybe he could just plug the
laptop in to the other fork of the Y. The Y's are called hubs, but I
think of them as outgoing to more than one add-on device. Especially
powered hubs. Would it work to plug the common port of a hub into the
printer, one of the multiple ports into the desktop, and when needed
plug the laptop in one of the other mulitple ports. (I don't know what
words to use for common and mulitple. I mean input and output, but in
this case the data would be going the opposite direction.)
I'm interested in all this myself, so any answers for a PC are greatly
appreciated.
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Or maybe he can make it wireless.
c) I think the cheapest wireless print server I found online was 20
dollars if no one else bids. Used of course. Would anyone buy that, or
would you just buy a new wireless printer? If you're curious, here's
its ad.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/LevelOne-WPS-9122-Wireless-G-Print-Server-w-One-USB-2-0-Port-/141491097877?pt=US_Print_Servers&hash=item20f186d115
auction ends at 10:30 tonight Sunday EST
d) Hmmm. I have a USB equivalent of an internal wifi card, to receive
signals from the router. If it can receive internet signals from the
router, can it plug into a USB printer and make a printer accept,
printer text signals from the same router, coming from the local network
computer instead of the the DSL modem?
(I suppose not, or I'd have heard about it, but I don't know why it
wouldn't.)
**What if you absolutely know you haven't written to a USB hard drive
for the last 10 minutes. Is there a chance of losing data or damaging
the structure by just pulling out the USB cord, or by turning off t he
power to the external drive??
Thanks.
It depends on the printer. If the printer is just a printer and not one
of the multi-function printer scanners, you may try this. (I have heard
that if the print server is not bidirectional the scanner will not work
as it feeds a data stream back to the computer, while the printer
accepts the data stream from the computer.)

I watched and found the cheapest wired print server I could find. It
was A D-Link DP-300U unit, One ethernet and one USB port.

I then hooked the print server to the LAN router with a standard LAN
cable, and the printer to the print server. With this arrangement, the
Print server appears on the Local Area network and I can print from any
computer on the LAN, wired or wireless, through the print server.


While the printer appears as a LAN printer you must have the printer
driver on each computer that uses the printer
Seymore4Head
2014-12-08 03:10:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
My friend didn't think about wireless or laptops and bought a printer
without wireless. It connects ONLY by USB. It's too late to return
it.
Could this be a job for a Raspberry Pi?
Anyone tried this?
I have been looking for a reason to buy one.
Post by micky
a) I know you can disconnect a USB harddrive by just pulling the cord
out, or you risk losing data**, but what's the most damage you could do
just by unplugging a printer? Interrupt the job and have to print it
again? And not even that if your last print job has already printed?
Or if it had stopped with an error message? Maybe he can just
transfer the cable from the desktop to the laptop when he wants to
print.
b) Or he can leave the printer connected to his desktop computer and if
there were some sort of Y USB connector, maybe he could just plug the
laptop in to the other fork of the Y. The Y's are called hubs, but I
think of them as outgoing to more than one add-on device. Especially
powered hubs. Would it work to plug the common port of a hub into the
printer, one of the multiple ports into the desktop, and when needed
plug the laptop in one of the other mulitple ports. (I don't know what
words to use for common and mulitple. I mean input and output, but in
this case the data would be going the opposite direction.)
I'm interested in all this myself, so any answers for a PC are greatly
appreciated.
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Or maybe he can make it wireless.
c) I think the cheapest wireless print server I found online was 20
dollars if no one else bids. Used of course. Would anyone buy that, or
would you just buy a new wireless printer? If you're curious, here's
its ad.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/LevelOne-WPS-9122-Wireless-G-Print-Server-w-One-USB-2-0-Port-/141491097877?pt=US_Print_Servers&hash=item20f186d115
auction ends at 10:30 tonight Sunday EST
d) Hmmm. I have a USB equivalent of an internal wifi card, to receive
signals from the router. If it can receive internet signals from the
router, can it plug into a USB printer and make a printer accept,
printer text signals from the same router, coming from the local network
computer instead of the the DSL modem?
(I suppose not, or I'd have heard about it, but I don't know why it
wouldn't.)
**What if you absolutely know you haven't written to a USB hard drive
for the last 10 minutes. Is there a chance of losing data or damaging
the structure by just pulling out the USB cord, or by turning off t he
power to the external drive??
Thanks.
Ken Springer
2014-12-08 17:00:07 UTC
Permalink
On 12/7/14 1:59 PM, micky wrote:

<snip>
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
It shouldn't.

You didn't say which computer was the Mac. If it's the desktop, and
relatively new (mine is 5.5 years old), wireless is built-in, unlike
Windows desktops I've seen.

All of the solutions provided should work, but I networked my Windows
computers and this Mac, and attached the USB printer to the Mac. I have
a network printer now. I am not a wireless fan, so only my Win 7
netbook used wireless. When I wanted to print something from a Windows
computer, I just selected the printer, actually it was the default
printer, and printed. The downside in this type of scenario is the
computer that has the printer connected must be on. And possibly logged
in, I don't know for sure since the Mac was always on.



<snip>
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 25.0
Thunderbird 24.6.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
micky
2014-12-09 04:29:08 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 08 Dec 2014 10:00:07 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
<snip>
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
It shouldn't.
You didn't say which computer was the Mac. If it's the desktop, and
The desktop he has now is a Mac, and so old it won't even run the
printer. And recently he found files it wouldnt' download because it
was so old. Mac OS 10.4, I think. I forget what aniimal that is.
Post by Ken Springer
relatively new (mine is 5.5 years old), wireless is built-in, unlike
Oh good. I think he bought a new Mac desktop 2 months ago but hasn't
had time to take it out of the box. Either the desktop or the printer,
he says, he's used two months of hte 12-month warranty and still doesn't
know if they work.

He keeps busy with his job and other worthwhile things. Often helping
other people, no less.
Post by Ken Springer
Windows desktops I've seen.
All of the solutions provided should work, but I networked my Windows
computers and this Mac, and attached the USB printer to the Mac. I have
a network printer now. I am not a wireless fan, so only my Win 7
netbook used wireless. When I wanted to print something from a Windows
computer, I just selected the printer, actually it was the default
printer, and printed. The downside in this type of scenario is the
computer that has the printer connected must be on.
He may leave his desktop on all the time. I was surprissed when I heard
that.
Post by Ken Springer
And possibly logged
in, I don't know for sure since the Mac was always on.
When I met him he had no computer at all, years after everyone else did.
Now he has a Mac that's gotten too old, one that's new but in the box,
and an Acer netbook running XP that I'm sure would work with the new
printer, but he doesn't use much. Oh, and an Ipad. And IIUC, he has
an Apple laptop still in the box. But he doesn't waste money in any
other way, and even this is small compared to most people.
I ended up buying the wireless print server that no one else bid on, for
15 + 6 dolllars. It 's going to take months his new stuff running,
but this is a start.

The wireless print server that I didn't understand, because it was a
card that went into the printer, rreally did go into the printer. It
was a big printer with fancy options, like for an office.

I'm going to read over all the answers again and think about how they
apply to me and to him, and his landlady who sometimes depends on me to
fix her computer, and another family with 4 laptops, one for each of
them who only needed me twice iirc in several years.


Thank you and everyone else for the help.


<snip>
Ken Springer
2014-12-09 12:42:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
On Mon, 08 Dec 2014 10:00:07 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
<snip>
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
It shouldn't.
You didn't say which computer was the Mac. If it's the desktop, and
The desktop he has now is a Mac, and so old it won't even run the
printer. And recently he found files it wouldnt' download because it
was so old. Mac OS 10.4, I think. I forget what aniimal that is.
Tiger. This iMac came with 10.5, Leopard. It's also the first Mac I've
ever bought.
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
relatively new (mine is 5.5 years old), wireless is built-in, unlike
Oh good. I think he bought a new Mac desktop 2 months ago but hasn't
had time to take it out of the box. Either the desktop or the printer,
he says, he's used two months of hte 12-month warranty and still doesn't
know if they work.
He keeps busy with his job and other worthwhile things. Often helping
other people, no less.
Post by Ken Springer
Windows desktops I've seen.
All of the solutions provided should work, but I networked my Windows
computers and this Mac, and attached the USB printer to the Mac. I have
a network printer now. I am not a wireless fan, so only my Win 7
netbook used wireless. When I wanted to print something from a Windows
computer, I just selected the printer, actually it was the default
printer, and printed. The downside in this type of scenario is the
computer that has the printer connected must be on.
He may leave his desktop on all the time. I was surprissed when I heard
that.
Post by Ken Springer
And possibly logged
in, I don't know for sure since the Mac was always on.
When I met him he had no computer at all, years after everyone else did.
Now he has a Mac that's gotten too old, one that's new but in the box,
and an Acer netbook running XP that I'm sure would work with the new
printer, but he doesn't use much. Oh, and an Ipad. And IIUC, he has
an Apple laptop still in the box. But he doesn't waste money in any
other way, and even this is small compared to most people.
If he has a new Mac desktop, a new Mac laptop, and an iPad, why bother
with the old stuff? It seems a waste of time to me.

Back when my Mac was new, I took it to my inlaws to show them a Mac.
They are all Windows users. Their son brought his HP XP laptop. It
took me about 10 minutes to get connected to their network. It took
their son 3 hours to get his XP laptop connected.

No joke.

IMO, you guys are wasting your time with getting the old equipment to
work together. If you set up the new stuff, and if he has an Apple
account, all three Apple products should talk to each other without a
hitch. For Apple apps, lets say the notepad, if you enter something
into the notepad app on the desktop, in a couple of minutes the data you
entered will be downloaded to the laptop and iPad. And vice-versa.

Caveat... The age and model of the iPad may be an issue. I'm not a big
Apple user, no iPad, no iPhone, no iPod, etc. I don't buy a product
because it's Apple, I buy what fits my needs/desires/wants. My tablet
is a Google Nexus 7, which is Android. :-)
Post by micky
I ended up buying the wireless print server that no one else bid on, for
15 + 6 dolllars. It 's going to take months his new stuff running,
but this is a start.
?????? The last sentence isn't making any sense to me. It shouldn't
take much time at all to get the new stuff running, if it's all Apple.
Unless the problem is one of simply getting together to do it. <G>
Post by micky
The wireless print server that I didn't understand, because it was a
card that went into the printer, rreally did go into the printer. It
was a big printer with fancy options, like for an office.
I'm going to read over all the answers again and think about how they
apply to me and to him, and his landlady who sometimes depends on me to
fix her computer, and another family with 4 laptops, one for each of
them who only needed me twice iirc in several years.
Thank you and everyone else for the help.
<snip>
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 33.1
Thunderbird 31.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
Keith Nuttle
2014-12-09 14:15:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Springer
?????? The last sentence isn't making any sense to me. It shouldn't
take much time at all to get the new stuff running, if it's all Apple.
Unless the problem is one of simply getting together to do it. <G>
If you have the security code for the network there is no need to take
that long for any computer.

I have a mixed LAN Windows 8.1 and Windows XP, On Sunday my son in law
came with his new PC and it tool longer to give him the characters in
the pass code to the LAN than it did to connect.

I think in your comments there may be a slight Mac bias.
Ken Springer
2014-12-09 15:46:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keith Nuttle
Post by Ken Springer
?????? The last sentence isn't making any sense to me. It shouldn't
take much time at all to get the new stuff running, if it's all Apple.
Unless the problem is one of simply getting together to do it. <G>
If you have the security code for the network there is no need to take
that long for any computer.
With today's computers, agreed. But the 3 hr. issue with my nephew's
computer, one of 3 or 4 he brought to his parent's house, is accurate.
I sat there and watched him try to get it to connect, and never let him
live it down. (Actually, I went and watched TV while he worked at it.
LOL) I think it took him 5-10 minutes for the others, and that was
longer than it took this Mac to connect.

At the time, he was a Windows fanboi, nothing was ever going to be
better. He's mellowed a lot since then.

But keep this in perspective, at the time Win 7 was new, and MS has
improved in this area.
Post by Keith Nuttle
I have a mixed LAN Windows 8.1 and Windows XP, On Sunday my son in law
came with his new PC and it tool longer to give him the characters in
the pass code to the LAN than it did to connect.
As I just said, MS has improved.
Post by Keith Nuttle
I think in your comments there may be a slight Mac bias.
There's good and bad about both systems. I found a couple of things
about the Mac I didn't like the first day I had it. For instance,
there's no "Move" option when doing file management. It's buried in
there, but you have to use Terminal to do it. Nothing in the UI allows
this. I don't know if Apple has brought it back.

The lines you quoted had nothing to do with comparing the systems, just
noting that if they are working with two new Apple units, there won't be
any problem. It's just like using Homegroup in Win 7, except a tad
easier, especially if you have an Apple account. In this case, you
don't even need a home network.

Don't know if Homegroup is in 8 or not, I did my network the old
fashioned way here, since Homegroup is limited in the OS systems it will
work with.

It's not as easy to network a Mac to a PC as it should be, and it's
Apple's fault, not MS's. Maybe that's been corrected in Mavericks
and/or Yosemite, I don't know. And from what I've learned, Apple has
removed a couple of things from OS X that makes file management across a
network hard to accomplish. I don't know why, but that's another thing
I don't like.

If there are two new Apple computers, I don't understand trying to get
Tiger and XP to work with the printer, unless they just want to make it
work for whatever reason. Something I've been known to do.
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 33.1
Thunderbird 31.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
Keith Nuttle
2014-12-09 17:08:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Springer
Post by Keith Nuttle
Post by Ken Springer
?????? The last sentence isn't making any sense to me. It shouldn't
take much time at all to get the new stuff running, if it's all Apple.
Unless the problem is one of simply getting together to do it. <G>
If you have the security code for the network there is no need to take
that long for any computer.
With today's computers, agreed. But the 3 hr. issue with my nephew's
computer, one of 3 or 4 he brought to his parent's house, is accurate. I
sat there and watched him try to get it to connect, and never let him
live it down. (Actually, I went and watched TV while he worked at it.
LOL) I think it took him 5-10 minutes for the others, and that was
longer than it took this Mac to connect.
At the time, he was a Windows fanboi, nothing was ever going to be
better. He's mellowed a lot since then.
But keep this in perspective, at the time Win 7 was new, and MS has
improved in this area.
Post by Keith Nuttle
I have a mixed LAN Windows 8.1 and Windows XP, On Sunday my son in law
came with his new PC and it tool longer to give him the characters in
the pass code to the LAN than it did to connect.
As I just said, MS has improved.
Post by Keith Nuttle
I think in your comments there may be a slight Mac bias.
There's good and bad about both systems. I found a couple of things
about the Mac I didn't like the first day I had it. For instance,
there's no "Move" option when doing file management. It's buried in
there, but you have to use Terminal to do it. Nothing in the UI allows
this. I don't know if Apple has brought it back.
The lines you quoted had nothing to do with comparing the systems, just
noting that if they are working with two new Apple units, there won't be
any problem. It's just like using Homegroup in Win 7, except a tad
easier, especially if you have an Apple account. In this case, you
don't even need a home network.
Don't know if Homegroup is in 8 or not, I did my network the old
fashioned way here, since Homegroup is limited in the OS systems it will
work with.
It's not as easy to network a Mac to a PC as it should be, and it's
Apple's fault, not MS's. Maybe that's been corrected in Mavericks
and/or Yosemite, I don't know. And from what I've learned, Apple has
removed a couple of things from OS X that makes file management across a
network hard to accomplish. I don't know why, but that's another thing
I don't like.
If there are two new Apple computers, I don't understand trying to get
Tiger and XP to work with the printer, unless they just want to make it
work for whatever reason. Something I've been known to do.
Windows 8 has the Homegroup option, but I did not use it. I hooked the
Windows 8 unit into the LAN as a standalone computer that shared it
resources with the LAN. This removes Windows 8's control of the LAN.

Once I had Windows 8 up and running, I made the LAN connection through
the Network Connection Pane that pops up on the right side of the
desktop. I then went to the File explorer and shade those resources
that I wanted shared. I made sure that the Firewall permitted those
resources to access the LAN.

PS. I have not seen the Metro/Modern interface since I upgraded from
Windows 8 to Windows 8.1, and access all computer functions from the MS
Icon on the desktop toolbar.
micky
2014-12-09 21:41:18 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 09 Dec 2014 08:46:02 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
If there are two new Apple computers, I don't understand trying to get
Tiger and XP to work with the printer, unless they just want to make it
work for whatever reason. Something I've been known to do.
I'm not sure if he has an apple laptop. I lost track of his story, and
of course whatever he said, he may have returned it after that, if he
even bought one. (My own memory isn't so hot these days either.)

The only laptop I know he's used is the PC. I had him convinced that it
wouldn't be much effort to get out of bed and plug the rpinter into it
-- that was the first part of my OP, if just pulling the USB plug could
do any harm -- but he also though 21 dollars for the print server was
worth it.
Ken Springer
2014-12-10 16:02:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
On Tue, 09 Dec 2014 08:46:02 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
If there are two new Apple computers, I don't understand trying to get
Tiger and XP to work with the printer, unless they just want to make it
work for whatever reason. Something I've been known to do.
I'm not sure if he has an apple laptop. I lost track of his story, and
of course whatever he said, he may have returned it after that, if he
even bought one. (My own memory isn't so hot these days either.)
I know how this goes, I've given up trying to keep track of what goes on
with my inlaws systems. It's a case where the old adage (Too many cooks
spoil the pot.) is a perfect fit.
Post by micky
The only laptop I know he's used is the PC. I had him convinced that it
wouldn't be much effort to get out of bed and plug the rpinter into it
-- that was the first part of my OP, if just pulling the USB plug could
do any harm -- but he also though 21 dollars for the print server was
worth it.
As long as he doesn't want to share files without doing a modern day
version of sneakernet, it sounds like the print server is a great
solution for him.
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 33.1
Thunderbird 31.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
micky
2014-12-09 21:35:29 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 09 Dec 2014 05:42:49 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
On Mon, 08 Dec 2014 10:00:07 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
<snip>
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
It shouldn't.
You didn't say which computer was the Mac. If it's the desktop, and
The desktop he has now is a Mac, and so old it won't even run the
printer. And recently he found files it wouldnt' download because it
was so old. Mac OS 10.4, I think. I forget what aniimal that is.
Tiger. This iMac came with 10.5, Leopard. It's also the first Mac I've
ever bought.
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
relatively new (mine is 5.5 years old), wireless is built-in, unlike
Oh good. I think he bought a new Mac desktop 2 months ago but hasn't
had time to take it out of the box. Either the desktop or the printer,
he says, he's used two months of hte 12-month warranty and still doesn't
know if they work.
He keeps busy with his job and other worthwhile things. Often helping
other people, no less.
Post by Ken Springer
Windows desktops I've seen.
All of the solutions provided should work, but I networked my Windows
computers and this Mac, and attached the USB printer to the Mac. I have
a network printer now. I am not a wireless fan, so only my Win 7
netbook used wireless. When I wanted to print something from a Windows
computer, I just selected the printer, actually it was the default
printer, and printed. The downside in this type of scenario is the
computer that has the printer connected must be on.
He may leave his desktop on all the time. I was surprissed when I heard
that.
Post by Ken Springer
And possibly logged
in, I don't know for sure since the Mac was always on.
When I met him he had no computer at all, years after everyone else did.
Now he has a Mac that's gotten too old, one that's new but in the box,
and an Acer netbook running XP that I'm sure would work with the new
printer, but he doesn't use much. Oh, and an Ipad. And IIUC, he has
an Apple laptop still in the box. But he doesn't waste money in any
other way, and even this is small compared to most people.
If he has a new Mac desktop, a new Mac laptop, and an iPad, why bother
with the old stuff? It seems a waste of time to me.
See below.
Post by Ken Springer
Back when my Mac was new, I took it to my inlaws to show them a Mac.
They are all Windows users. Their son brought his HP XP laptop. It
took me about 10 minutes to get connected to their network. It took
their son 3 hours to get his XP laptop connected.
No joke.
I don't know if this is related. I took an old IBM Thinkpad on a car
trip to Dallas and most motels had a password I was supposed to enter.
I could almost never get it to work if there was a passwords. This was
running winME!

Now like my friend I have an Acer netbook running XP and it connects
just fine. The engine failed near Ashville, N.C and if I didn't have a
computer to shop for another car, I would have had to go buy one.
Post by Ken Springer
IMO, you guys are wasting your time with getting the old equipment to
work together.
No, I was talking about getting the new equipment installed and working.
He wants wireless so he can print easily from the laptop, wherever he is
at the time. I"m sorry I was confusing.
Post by Ken Springer
If you set up the new stuff, and if he has an Apple
account, all three Apple products should talk to each other without a
hitch. For Apple apps, lets say the notepad, if you enter something
into the notepad app on the desktop, in a couple of minutes the data you
entered will be downloaded to the laptop and iPad. And vice-versa.
Caveat... The age and model of the iPad may be an issue. I'm not a big
Apple user, no iPad, no iPhone, no iPod, etc. I don't buy a product
because it's Apple, I buy what fits my needs/desires/wants. My tablet
is a Google Nexus 7, which is Android. :-)
Post by micky
I ended up buying the wireless print server that no one else bid on, for
15 + 6 dolllars. It 's going to take months his new stuff running,
but this is a start.
?????? The last sentence isn't making any sense to me. It shouldn't
take much time at all to get the new stuff running, if it's all Apple.
It will because it's still in the box. It's been in the box for 2
months and will remain there who knows how long.
Post by Ken Springer
Unless the problem is one of simply getting together to do it. <G>
Yeah, that's it.
Ken Springer
2014-12-10 16:18:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
On Tue, 09 Dec 2014 05:42:49 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
On Mon, 08 Dec 2014 10:00:07 -0700, Ken Springer
<snip>
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
If he has a new Mac desktop, a new Mac laptop, and an iPad, why bother
with the old stuff? It seems a waste of time to me.
See below.
Post by Ken Springer
Back when my Mac was new, I took it to my inlaws to show them a Mac.
They are all Windows users. Their son brought his HP XP laptop. It
took me about 10 minutes to get connected to their network. It took
their son 3 hours to get his XP laptop connected.
No joke.
I don't know if this is related. I took an old IBM Thinkpad on a car
trip to Dallas and most motels had a password I was supposed to enter.
I could almost never get it to work if there was a passwords. This was
running winME!
Now like my friend I have an Acer netbook running XP and it connects
just fine. The engine failed near Ashville, N.C and if I didn't have a
computer to shop for another car, I would have had to go buy one.
In this case, and my nephew's case, hardware may also be part of the
problem.

I think this is a downside of the "open" way MS has done things, some
thing no one seems to talk about. Someone puts out an accessory card
that's somehow just a little bit different than what the programming
expects, and the system fails. But Apple's "walled garden" approach
seems to keep this to a minimum.

I was once rebuilding a Gateway desktop to give away, XP for the OS.
After installing OS updates, the computer would not shut down. Tracked
the issue down to a particular high security update. Leave it out,
worked fine. MS offered free tech support for this update, and I kept
escalating it up the food chain until I was dealing with MS engineers in
New Delhi, India, who finally gave up on the problem.

I'm no trained tech, but I sat and watched how the computer reacted, and
a couple weeks later I said to myself "I wonder what would happen
if.......") I put in an older Ethernet card, and everything worked fine.
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
IMO, you guys are wasting your time with getting the old equipment to
work together.
No, I was talking about getting the new equipment installed and working.
He wants wireless so he can print easily from the laptop, wherever he is
at the time. I"m sorry I was confusing.
Sorry here too, I should have said "getting the old equipment to work
together with the new printer.
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
If you set up the new stuff, and if he has an Apple
account, all three Apple products should talk to each other without a
hitch. For Apple apps, lets say the notepad, if you enter something
into the notepad app on the desktop, in a couple of minutes the data you
entered will be downloaded to the laptop and iPad. And vice-versa.
Caveat... The age and model of the iPad may be an issue. I'm not a big
Apple user, no iPad, no iPhone, no iPod, etc. I don't buy a product
because it's Apple, I buy what fits my needs/desires/wants. My tablet
is a Google Nexus 7, which is Android. :-)
Post by micky
I ended up buying the wireless print server that no one else bid on, for
15 + 6 dolllars. It 's going to take months his new stuff running,
but this is a start.
?????? The last sentence isn't making any sense to me. It shouldn't
take much time at all to get the new stuff running, if it's all Apple.
It will because it's still in the box. It's been in the box for 2
months and will remain there who knows how long.
And it will depend on how familiar you are with the Mac way of doing
things, too.
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
Unless the problem is one of simply getting together to do it. <G>
Yeah, that's it.
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 33.1
Thunderbird 31.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
micky
2014-12-14 00:26:12 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Dec 2014 09:18:12 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
On Tue, 09 Dec 2014 05:42:49 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
On Mon, 08 Dec 2014 10:00:07 -0700, Ken Springer
<snip>
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
If he has a new Mac desktop, a new Mac laptop, and an iPad, why bother
with the old stuff? It seems a waste of time to me.
See below.
Post by Ken Springer
Back when my Mac was new, I took it to my inlaws to show them a Mac.
They are all Windows users. Their son brought his HP XP laptop. It
took me about 10 minutes to get connected to their network. It took
their son 3 hours to get his XP laptop connected.
No joke.
I don't know if this is related. I took an old IBM Thinkpad on a car
trip to Dallas and most motels had a password I was supposed to enter.
I could almost never get it to work if there was a passwords. This was
running winME!
Now like my friend I have an Acer netbook running XP and it connects
just fine. The engine failed near Ashville, N.C and if I didn't have a
computer to shop for another car, I would have had to go buy one.
In this case, and my nephew's case, hardware may also be part of the
problem.
I think this is a downside of the "open" way MS has done things, some
thing no one seems to talk about. Someone puts out an accessory card
that's somehow just a little bit different than what the programming
expects, and the system fails. But Apple's "walled garden" approach
seems to keep this to a minimum.
I was once rebuilding a Gateway desktop to give away, XP for the OS.
After installing OS updates, the computer would not shut down. Tracked
the issue down to a particular high security update. Leave it out,
worked fine. MS offered free tech support for this update, and I kept
escalating it up the food chain until I was dealing with MS engineers in
New Delhi, India, who finally gave up on the problem.
I'm no trained tech, but I sat and watched how the computer reacted, and
a couple weeks later I said to myself "I wonder what would happen
if.......") I put in an older Ethernet card, and everything worked fine.
I don't think I would have figured that out. I think you know more than
I do.
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
IMO, you guys are wasting your time with getting the old equipment to
work together.
No, I was talking about getting the new equipment installed and working.
He wants wireless so he can print easily from the laptop, wherever he is
at the time. I"m sorry I was confusing.
Sorry here too, I should have said "getting the old equipment to work
together with the new printer.
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
If you set up the new stuff, and if he has an Apple
account, all three Apple products should talk to each other without a
hitch. For Apple apps, lets say the notepad, if you enter something
into the notepad app on the desktop, in a couple of minutes the data you
entered will be downloaded to the laptop and iPad. And vice-versa.
Caveat... The age and model of the iPad may be an issue. I'm not a big
Apple user, no iPad, no iPhone, no iPod, etc. I don't buy a product
because it's Apple, I buy what fits my needs/desires/wants. My tablet
is a Google Nexus 7, which is Android. :-)
Post by micky
I ended up buying the wireless print server that no one else bid on, for
15 + 6 dolllars. It 's going to take months his new stuff running,
but this is a start.
?????? The last sentence isn't making any sense to me. It shouldn't
take much time at all to get the new stuff running, if it's all Apple.
It will because it's still in the box. It's been in the box for 2
months and will remain there who knows how long.
And it will depend on how familiar you are with the Mac way of doing
things, too.
Very little. Let me ask you a question. He was going away and worried
about burglars breaking in and stealing his computer. I told him a much
greater risk was harddrive failure and he should get a backup drive. He
said Yes. Because of what's below** I lent him a 1.5TB internal drive
and a BlacX caddy, and we connected it together and he bought and
installed SuperDuper. I tried to look at the backup it made, but
because I know so little about Mac, I didn't know if I was looking at
the original or thte backup. But he continued to run SuperDuper, with
scheduled backups. Months later something went wrong and his old in
and out email was missing. He looked, he said, on the backup and it
wasn't there either.

There seemed to be a chance that it had run and made the backup just
like the original, no email. But it wasn't scheduled to run. I
didn't know what to say or do.

A month ago when my harddrive started clicking, I rushed to get my HD
and caddy back to make full backups. I looked at the drive first and
it had no partitions. I'm not stupid enough to give it to him that
way, and he's not technical enough to delete a partition (but the
subject is a sore one with me, even though we talked often and he hasn't
complained again, so I haven't asked him.)

Then I found out that Mac and MS have no partition designs in common.
And I don't remember partitioning the drive at his house. I'm sure I
checked this before I gave the HD to him, but even if I didn't, how
could we/he run SuperDuper without its complaining that it couldn't
write to the harddrive. It didn't complain at all. And I know it
gave a list of drives to choose one for the To: drive and the external
drive was on the list.

What happened?


**I ordered one from the big store in NYC, J&R or the other one with two
initials. and after they shipped it, I read online that it didn't work
right with what he had, even though most of the same company's drives
did. They gave me my money back with no problem, but then I didn't buy
anything else.
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
Unless the problem is one of simply getting together to do it. <G>
Yeah, that's it.
Ken Springer
2014-12-14 16:44:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
On Wed, 10 Dec 2014 09:18:12 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
On Tue, 09 Dec 2014 05:42:49 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by micky
On Mon, 08 Dec 2014 10:00:07 -0700, Ken Springer
<snip>

Since this reply is primarily Mac help for micky, if you're only
interested in Windows related stuff, skip on to the next message. :-)

micky, this could get a bit over the top for the Windows people, so if
you wish, feel free to take this to email if you feel it's appropriate.
If you want to do this, screenshots are very useful, and the ability
to do this is built in to OS X. Read this to find out how.
http://guides.macrumors.com/Taking_Screenshots_in_Mac_OS_X

MS made a big deal of its new "Snipping Tool" in Win 7, but it's a poor
system compared to OS X. You need 3rd party software like Irfanview to
match OS X in this case.

Also, I had to do some web searching in order to try to reply to your
questions.
Post by micky
Post by Ken Springer
And it will depend on how familiar you are with the Mac way of doing
things, too.
Very little. Let me ask you a question. He was going away and worried
about burglars breaking in and stealing his computer. I told him a much
greater risk was harddrive failure and he should get a backup drive. He
said Yes. Because of what's below** I lent him a 1.5TB internal drive
and a BlacX caddy, and we connected it together and he bought and
installed SuperDuper. I tried to look at the backup it made, but
because I know so little about Mac, I didn't know if I was looking at
the original or thte backup. But he continued to run SuperDuper, with
scheduled backups. Months later something went wrong and his old in
and out email was missing. He looked, he said, on the backup and it
wasn't there either.
Unless I've lost track, this is on the old Mac, right? That's older
than the first Mac I ever bought, which is this Mac. LOL And I don't
have enough knowledge about his system to get very specific.

What I've learned since buying this Mac, both systems accomplish the
same things, they just do it differently with fairly drastically
different looking UI's, coupled with a totally different OS command set.
But the bottom line is it's not always that much different from
driving a Ford or Chevy when viewed from the average user's perspective.

I don't run SuperDuper, although I was going to check it out when I was
looking for an alternative to Time Machine. Time Machine is Apple's
back up program that appeared in 10.5 Leopard, it will not work in 10.4
Tiger. I purchased a competing program to SuperDuper, but never got it
installed. But I do use Time Machine, and from what I understand,
Windows 8's File History is MS's version/answer/whatever to Time Machine.

From what I see Time Machine do, it's really just an incremental backup
system that runs far more often that people have traditionally set up
their backup software to do.
Post by micky
There seemed to be a chance that it had run and made the backup just
like the original, no email. But it wasn't scheduled to run. I
didn't know what to say or do.
A month ago when my harddrive started clicking, I rushed to get my HD
and caddy back to make full backups. I looked at the drive first and
it had no partitions. I'm not stupid enough to give it to him that
way, and he's not technical enough to delete a partition (but the
subject is a sore one with me, even though we talked often and he hasn't
complained again, so I haven't asked him.)
NTFS and the Mac's HFS filesystems are completely different animals.
Apple apparently introduced the ability to read NTFS drives in Tiger,
but even today, OS X (AFAIK, I'm not running the current OS X Yosemite),
Mac's cannot write to NTFS drives. Using 3rd party software, you can.
I've not looked recently, but I've not found anything in Windows land
that will read Mac formatted hard drives.

I'm completely guessing here, but based on your next paragraph, you gave
him an NTFS formatted drive. When the Mac wouldn't write it, he may
have formatted it HFS for the Mac. When you got it back, Windows threw
in the towel, because it cannot read/write/format HFS formatting. So to
you, it looks empty.

If you haven't done anything to this drive yet, you could download
Gparted, the version that boots from a CD. I think it will read HFS
drives, but have never looked to see if it really can.
http://gparted.sourceforge.net/index.php
Post by micky
Then I found out that Mac and MS have no partition designs in common.
And I don't remember partitioning the drive at his house. I'm sure I
checked this before I gave the HD to him, but even if I didn't, how
could we/he run SuperDuper without its complaining that it couldn't
write to the harddrive. It didn't complain at all. And I know it
gave a list of drives to choose one for the To: drive and the external
drive was on the list.
What happened?
At the moment, I don't have enough info to know, only to guess at
possibilities.

1. Perhaps SuperDuper automatically formatted the destination or your
friend told it to do it.

2. Was SuperDuper configured to back up everything, or is the default
to just back up some things? Did you friend change the configuration?

3. Have you looked at the drive using a Mac to see if there's anything
on the drive?

There's just so many possibilities for a problem. Take Time Machine,
for example. While it will show me any NTFS drives/partitions, it
cannot back up an NTFS partition. So while I can read, write, and
format both NTFS and FAT drives (combo of OS X features and 3rd party
software), I only have HFS formatted partitions attached to my Mac.


<snip>
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 33.1
Thunderbird 31.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
Fred McKenzie
2014-12-10 18:48:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
Oh, and an Ipad.
Micky-

Next you will find that the iPad will not print to the USB printer, even
though it is on the network. The iPad uses the AirPrint system, which
only works over Ethernet or WiFi, NOT USB.

There are iPad Printing Apps that can get around the problem
(PrintCentral for example), and Apps from various printer manufacturers
that work with their printers. However they can not be used from within
other Apps unless they have an "Open In" or "Open Using" option. They
have their own web browsing, mail and photo functions to enable printing.

There are also programs that run on your computer to share its printer
as AirPrint over the network. The computer must be turned on any time
you want to print from the iPad.

Fred
micky
2014-12-11 02:48:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
Oh, and an Ipad.
Micky-
Next you will find that the iPad will not print to the USB printer, even
though it is on the network. The iPad uses the AirPrint system, which
only works over Ethernet or WiFi, NOT USB.
Ugh.
Post by Fred McKenzie
There are iPad Printing Apps that can get around the problem
(PrintCentral for example), and Apps from various printer manufacturers
(BTW, this reminds me. He doesn't have an apple laptop after all, I
think. He has an apple ipad, or whatever by apple is called a
tablet. I don't like to be pushy in helping him, because every guy
likes to do things themselves if they can. Plus I don't know much about
apple stuff. I'd like to learn, but on someone who is more desperate
than he is.)
Post by Fred McKenzie
that work with their printers. However they can not be used from within
other Apps unless they have an "Open In" or "Open Using" option. They
have their own web browsing, mail and photo functions to enable printing.
There are also programs that run on your computer to share its printer
as AirPrint over the network. The computer must be turned on any time
you want to print from the iPad.
He might be leaving it on anyhow. I wouldn't do that but I don't tell
him he shouldn't. And from what you say, it might turn out to be a good
thing.

I'll keep the words AirPrint in mind.
Post by Fred McKenzie
Fred
Ken Springer
2014-12-11 05:57:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
Oh, and an Ipad.
Micky-
Next you will find that the iPad will not print to the USB printer, even
though it is on the network. The iPad uses the AirPrint system, which
only works over Ethernet or WiFi, NOT USB.
Ugh.
I should have asked Fred in my reply to him if this applies to all
iPads, or just some of the older ones.
Post by micky
Post by Fred McKenzie
There are iPad Printing Apps that can get around the problem
(PrintCentral for example), and Apps from various printer manufacturers
(BTW, this reminds me. He doesn't have an apple laptop after all, I
think. He has an apple ipad, or whatever by apple is called a
tablet. I don't like to be pushy in helping him, because every guy
likes to do things themselves if they can. Plus I don't know much about
apple stuff. I'd like to learn, but on someone who is more desperate
than he is.)
The iPad is Apple's tablet, and there's a smaller version called the
iPad Mini.
Post by micky
Post by Fred McKenzie
that work with their printers. However they can not be used from within
other Apps unless they have an "Open In" or "Open Using" option. They
have their own web browsing, mail and photo functions to enable printing.
There are also programs that run on your computer to share its printer
as AirPrint over the network. The computer must be turned on any time
you want to print from the iPad.
He might be leaving it on anyhow. I wouldn't do that but I don't tell
him he shouldn't. And from what you say, it might turn out to be a good
thing.
I'll keep the words AirPrint in mind.
Post by Fred McKenzie
Fred
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 33.1
Thunderbird 31.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
micky
2015-01-01 05:16:12 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Dec 2014 22:57:02 -0700, Ken Springer
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
Oh, and an Ipad.
Micky-
Next you will find that the iPad will not print to the USB printer, even
though it is on the network. The iPad uses the AirPrint system, which
only works over Ethernet or WiFi, NOT USB.
Ugh.
I should have asked Fred in my reply to him if this applies to all
iPads, or just some of the older ones.
Post by micky
Post by Fred McKenzie
There are iPad Printing Apps that can get around the problem
(PrintCentral for example), and Apps from various printer manufacturers
(BTW, this reminds me. He doesn't have an apple laptop after all, I
think. He has an apple ipad, or whatever by apple is called a
tablet. I don't like to be pushy in helping him, because every guy
likes to do things themselves if they can. Plus I don't know much about
apple stuff. I'd like to learn, but on someone who is more desperate
than he is.)
The iPad is Apple's tablet, and there's a smaller version called the
iPad Mini.
Thanks.
Post by Ken Springer
Post by micky
Post by Fred McKenzie
that work with their printers. However they can not be used from within
other Apps unless they have an "Open In" or "Open Using" option. They
have their own web browsing, mail and photo functions to enable printing.
There are also programs that run on your computer to share its printer
as AirPrint over the network. The computer must be turned on any time
you want to print from the iPad.
He might be leaving it on anyhow. I wouldn't do that but I don't tell
him he shouldn't. And from what you say, it might turn out to be a good
thing.
I'll keep the words AirPrint in mind.
Post by Fred McKenzie
Fred
Ken Springer
2014-12-11 05:47:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
Oh, and an Ipad.
Micky-
Next you will find that the iPad will not print to the USB printer, even
though it is on the network. The iPad uses the AirPrint system, which
only works over Ethernet or WiFi, NOT USB.
There are iPad Printing Apps that can get around the problem
(PrintCentral for example), and Apps from various printer manufacturers
that work with their printers. However they can not be used from within
other Apps unless they have an "Open In" or "Open Using" option. They
have their own web browsing, mail and photo functions to enable printing.
There are also programs that run on your computer to share its printer
as AirPrint over the network. The computer must be turned on any time
you want to print from the iPad.
Fred,

Does the iPad have a print to PDF option like OS X? I don't have an
iPad, so no clue.
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 33.1
Thunderbird 31.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
Fred McKenzie
2014-12-12 20:34:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Springer
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
Oh, and an Ipad.
Micky-
Next you will find that the iPad will not print to the USB printer, even
though it is on the network. The iPad uses the AirPrint system, which
only works over Ethernet or WiFi, NOT USB.
There are iPad Printing Apps that can get around the problem
(PrintCentral for example), and Apps from various printer manufacturers
that work with their printers. However they can not be used from within
other Apps unless they have an "Open In" or "Open Using" option. They
have their own web browsing, mail and photo functions to enable printing.
There are also programs that run on your computer to share its printer
as AirPrint over the network. The computer must be turned on any time
you want to print from the iPad.
Fred,
Does the iPad have a print to PDF option like OS X? I don't have an
iPad, so no clue.
Ken-

Yes, it applies to all iPads. The original iPad could not print when it
first came out. An early revision to the iOS added AirPrint capability.

I have an old iPad 2, but it runs the latest iOS 8.1.2. It does not
have a "print to PDF" option, but there are paid Apps that claim to
provide that. (I think PrintCentral can be upgraded to do that for a
price.)

One program that can share a computer printer as AirPrint over the
network, is Printopia (for Macintosh) at
<http://www.ecamm.com/mac/printopia/>.

If you need more info on iPads, try the comp.mobile.ipad newsgroup.
There is also an Apple forum at
<https://discussions.apple.com/community/ipad/using_ipad>.

Fred
Ken Springer
2014-12-12 22:11:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by Ken Springer
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
Oh, and an Ipad.
Micky-
Next you will find that the iPad will not print to the USB printer, even
though it is on the network. The iPad uses the AirPrint system, which
only works over Ethernet or WiFi, NOT USB.
There are iPad Printing Apps that can get around the problem
(PrintCentral for example), and Apps from various printer manufacturers
that work with their printers. However they can not be used from within
other Apps unless they have an "Open In" or "Open Using" option. They
have their own web browsing, mail and photo functions to enable printing.
There are also programs that run on your computer to share its printer
as AirPrint over the network. The computer must be turned on any time
you want to print from the iPad.
Fred,
Does the iPad have a print to PDF option like OS X? I don't have an
iPad, so no clue.
Ken-
Yes, it applies to all iPads. The original iPad could not print when it
first came out. An early revision to the iOS added AirPrint capability.
I have an old iPad 2, but it runs the latest iOS 8.1.2. It does not
have a "print to PDF" option, but there are paid Apps that claim to
provide that. (I think PrintCentral can be upgraded to do that for a
price.)
One program that can share a computer printer as AirPrint over the
network, is Printopia (for Macintosh) at
<http://www.ecamm.com/mac/printopia/>.
If you need more info on iPads, try the comp.mobile.ipad newsgroup.
There is also an Apple forum at
<https://discussions.apple.com/community/ipad/using_ipad>.
Thanks, Fred, I was just curious about the iPad. I had been planning on
buying an iPad Mini until I saw the Google Nexus 7. :-)
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 33.1
Thunderbird 31.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
Fred McKenzie
2014-12-08 18:58:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Micky-

Two possibilities:

1. An Apple AirPort Extreme (WiFi router) has a USB port that can be
used with a USB printer. (An Apple Time Capsule is the same, but has a
Hard Drive that can be accessed over the network.)

2. You can install the printer on a Macintosh USB port and share it
over the network. Take a look at System Preferences, Sharing.

Fred
Bob F
2014-12-09 03:03:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Micky-
1. An Apple AirPort Extreme (WiFi router) has a USB port that can be
used with a USB printer. (An Apple Time Capsule is the same, but has
a Hard Drive that can be accessed over the network.)
Many routers now have USB ports, which can handle printers or usb hard drives.
micky
2014-12-09 04:30:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob F
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Micky-
1. An Apple AirPort Extreme (WiFi router) has a USB port that can be
used with a USB printer. (An Apple Time Capsule is the same, but has
a Hard Drive that can be accessed over the network.)
Many routers now have USB ports, which can handle printers or usb hard drives.
Good to know. For him and me.


Thanks everyone.
c***@isbd.net
2014-12-09 10:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob F
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Micky-
1. An Apple AirPort Extreme (WiFi router) has a USB port that can be
used with a USB printer. (An Apple Time Capsule is the same, but has
a Hard Drive that can be accessed over the network.)
Many routers now have USB ports, which can handle printers or usb hard drives.
However I've found that although they work they can be rather slow,
routers don't have fast/powerful processors usually and the printer
USB will be low on priority. Printing nowadays can involve firing
quite a lot of data at the printer.

I found that printing via the USB port on my Draytek Vigor 2820n (not
by any means a basic router) was very slow even compared with printing
using a Raspberry Pi as the network -> USB link. (I have an only HP
1320 printer that is parallel and USB only)
--
Chris Green
·
Paul
2014-12-09 12:59:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@isbd.net
Post by Bob F
Post by Fred McKenzie
Post by micky
OTOH, he has a Mac. Does that make a difference?
Micky-
1. An Apple AirPort Extreme (WiFi router) has a USB port that can be
used with a USB printer. (An Apple Time Capsule is the same, but has
a Hard Drive that can be accessed over the network.)
Many routers now have USB ports, which can handle printers or usb hard drives.
However I've found that although they work they can be rather slow,
routers don't have fast/powerful processors usually and the printer
USB will be low on priority. Printing nowadays can involve firing
quite a lot of data at the printer.
I found that printing via the USB port on my Draytek Vigor 2820n (not
by any means a basic router) was very slow even compared with printing
using a Raspberry Pi as the network -> USB link. (I have an only HP
1320 printer that is parallel and USB only)
The best processor I could find in a modern router, was a
1GHz ARM in the 802.11ac class ones. Which is a bit better
than a stock PI at 700MHz.

Paul
Stuart
2014-12-09 11:15:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by micky
b) Or he can leave the printer connected to his desktop computer and i
Just "share" it over the network from the desktop.
--
Stuart Winsor

Tools With A Mission
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